Killer whales are hunting fishing boats like prey

(Photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)

 

Fishing boats are coming under attack by an unlikely band of marauders bent on stealing their cargo.

Killer whales have reportedly been zeroing in on boats from the Gulf of Alaska to Aleutian Island to the Bering Sea — sometimes trailing them for days on end.

And when those nets are teeming with the day’s catch, they make their move, sawing through twine and feasting on the cargo.

In a letter to North Pacific Fisheries Management Council, fisherman Robert Hanson described a particularly precarious encounter, as reported in the Alaska Dispatch News.

The seasoned captain noted that he lost spent 4,000 gallons of gas trying to outrun a pod of whales last month — even drifting silently for 18 hours — before losing 12,000 pounds to his net-gnawing pursuers.

And the whales, which can grow up to 11 tons and race at speeds of 30 miles per hour, don’t respond to noisemakers either. In fact, the electronic horns designed to disperse them have become siren calls … for supper.

“It became a dinner bell,” fishing boat operator Paul Clampitt told the National Post.

Fishing boats are coming under attack by an unlikely band of marauders bent on stealing their cargo.

Killer whales have reportedly been zeroing in on boats from the Gulf of Alaska to Aleutian Island to the Bering Sea — sometimes trailing them for days on end.

And when those nets are teeming with the day’s catch, they make their move, sawing through twine and feasting on the cargo.

In a letter to North Pacific Fisheries Management Council, fisherman Robert Hanson described a particularly precarious encounter, as reported in the Alaska Dispatch News.

The seasoned captain noted that he lost spent 4,000 gallons of gas trying to outrun a pod of whales last month — even drifting silently for 18 hours — before losing 12,000 pounds to his net-gnawing pursuers.

And the whales, which can grow up to 11 tons and race at speeds of 30 miles per hour, don’t respond to noisemakers either. In fact, the electronic horns designed to disperse them have become siren calls … for supper.

“It became a dinner bell,” fishing boat operator Paul Clampitt told the National Post.

Source :

MNN

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